How Much Did the Flyers Pay For A Point?

The most expensive point celebrating with the least expensive point. You're completely shocked, I know.(Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

During the season, there was a really interesting post over at Jewels From the Crown about how much players were being paid per point they scored.  Unfortunately, his story title was even better: I would like to buy some points. How much are they?

There are a few ways of looking at this topic in general, such as Bird Watcher's Anonymous looking at points divided by salary over the past 10 years.  Really an interesting read.  The Copper & Blue then took that data and showed why Nashville should be the model for NHL teams.

Quisp was nice enough to give me the spreadsheet he used for his post at JFtC and I updated it to include the full season and swap in a few Flyers for his Kings.  This will allow comparison between some of the Flyers and the rest of the league.

Jump for that chart as well as a full table for all of the Flyers players.

As explained in the JFtC article, the table is color-coordinated with the darker the background, the higher the cap hit.  The white background are players in their entry-level contracts.  Obviously, entry-level deals will be of higher value, so it might not help you to compare.

Table key:  Cap is obviously the player's cap hit, while Pts = points, GP = games played, and PPG = points per game.  The two that need explaining, however, are Cost/Pt(1) and Cost/Pt(2).  The first column could be called "true cost" as it simply divides a player's cap hit by the amount of points he scored to find out how much each point cost the team.  Now, before anybody screams that there are more ways a player can contribute, I know.  This is just a fun exercise because NHL GMs tend to undervalue two-way players, and I'm curious what they are actually paying the flashy goal scorers. 

The second Cost/Pt column adjusts for games played, so you take the player's scoring rate and extend it to a full season.  If you want to know the formula, it's [(GP/82)*Cap Hit]/Pts.  Generally, they're pretty close, but for players like Joffrey Lupul and Daniel Sedin, it shows how much their injury cost the team and how much a healthy player would have.


Cap Pts Cost/Pt(1) GP PPG Cost/Pt(2)
Ovechkin $9,538,462 109 $87,509 72 1.51 $76,837
Crosby $8,700,000 109 $79,817 81 1.35 $78,843
Malkin $8,700,000 77 $112,987 67 1.15 $92,319
E. Staal $8,250,000 70 $117,857 70 1.00 $100,610
B. Richards $7,800,000 91 $85,714 80 1.14 $83,624
Lacavalier $7,727,273 70 $110,390 82 0.85 $110,390
Gaborik $7,500,000 86 $87,209 76 1.13 $80,828
Heatley $7,500,000 82 $91,463 82 1.00 $91,463
Gomez $7,357,143 59 $124,697 78 0.76 $118,615
Thornton $7,200,000 89 $80,899 79 1.13 $77,939
Vanek $7,142,857 53 $134,771 71 0.75 $116,692
Drury $7,050,000 32 $220,313 77 0.42 $206,879
Iginla $7,000,000 69 $101,449 82 0.84 $101,449
Spezza $7,000,000 57 $122,807 60 0.95 $89,859
Kopitar $6,800,000 81 $83,951 82 0.99 $83,951
Datsyuk $6,700,000 70 $95,714 80 0.88 $93,380
Stasny $6,600,000 79 $83,544 81 0.98 $82,525
Briere $6,500,000 53 $122,642 75 0.71 $112,172
Kovalchuk $6,389,300 85 $75,168 76 1.12 $69,668
Marleau $6,300,000 83 $75,904 82 1.01 $75,904
Smyth $6,250,000 53 $117,925 67 0.79 $96,353
H. Sedin $6,100,000 112 $54,464 82 1.37 $54,464
D. Sedin $6,100,000 85 $71,765 63 1.35 $55,136
Zetterberg $6,083,333 70 $86,905 74 0.95 $78,426
Cammalleri $6,000,000 50 $120,000 65 0.77 $95,122
St. Louis $5,250,000 94 $55,851 82 1.15 $55,851
Hossa $5,275,000 51 $103,431 57 0.89 $71,897
Havlat $5,000,000 54 $92,593 73 0.74 $82,430
Lupul $4,250,000 14 $303,571 23 0.61 $85,148
Handzus $4,000,000 42 $95,238 81 0.52 $94,077
Tavares $3,750,000 54 $69,444 82 0.66 $69,444
Stamkos $3,725,000 95 $39,211 82 1.16 $39,211
Williams $3,500,000 29 $120,690 49 0.59 $72,119
Duchene $3,200,000 55 $58,182 81 0.68 $57,472
Brown $3,175,000 56 $56,696 82 0.68 $56,696
Parise $3,125,000 82 $38,110 81 1.01 $37,645
Frolov $2,900,000 51 $56,863 81 0.63 $56,169
Backstrom $2,400,000 101 $23,762 82 1.23 $23,762
van Riemsdyk $1,654,167 35 $47,262 78 0.45 $44,956
Gagner $1,625,000 41 $39,634 68 0.60 $32,867
Upshall $1,500,000 32 $46,875 49 0.65 $28,011
Voracek $1,270,833 50 $25,417 81 0.62 $25,107
Perron $918,333 47 $19,539 82 0.57 $19,539
Giroux $821,667 47 $17,482 82 0.57 $17,482
Simmonds $821,667 40 $20,542 78 0.51 $19,540

 

What's really awesome about this table is that it's sortable - thanks Travis! - so you can click on the headings to sort them how you wish.  Right now, they're sorted by Cap Hit.  As you can tell, the five best bargains are still on their entry-level deals.  And while Danny Briere is expensive, he's not as expensive as fellow free agents Drury and Gomez, and is only marginally more expensive than Mike Cammalleri and Ryan Smyth.  Small win.

Really, there isn't much to say about the table except play around with it.  What Quisp said in his post still holds true:  the highly paid players may not be the best bargains (in terms of cost per point), but if you sort by points per game, you see what you're paying for.  Keep in mind that Nicklas Backstrom just signed for $6.7 million per, so even he is no longer the entry-level steal every team covets.

Now, before getting to the most interesting numbers (forwards), let's get the ugly/boring/inconsequential numbers out of the way.

Defense table:


Cap Pts Cost/Pt(1) GP PPG Cost/Pt(2)
Timonen $6,333,333 39 $162,393 82 0.48 $162,393
Pronger $6,250,000 55 $113,636 82 0.67 $113,636
Carle $3,437,500 35 $98,214 80 0.44 $95,819
Coburn $1,300,000 19 $68,421 81 0.23 $67,587
Parent $855,000 3 $285,000 48 0.06 $166,829
Bartulis $516,667 9 $57,407 53 0.17 $37,105
Tollefsen $600,000 2 $300,000 18 0.11 $65,854
Syvret $575,000 4 $143,750 21 0.19 $36,814
Krajicek $700,000 2 $350,000 27 0.07 $115,244

I threw in OKT just to show the difference between him, Syvret, and Krajicek.  As the best value in Cost(2), Danny Syvret truly is Offensive Dynamo.  Oskars Bartulis isn't far behind. 

And yes, I fully realize Kimmo Timonen being just barely ahead of Ryan Parent in this column is scary, but that's why I prefaced it by saying it's all for fun and this is the throw-away portion of the show.  Cost Per Point for defensemen doesn't really tell you anything.

Excess forwards:


Cap Pts Cost/Pt(1) GP PPG Cost/Pt(2)
Pyorala $500,000 4 $125,000 36 0.11 $54,878
Leino $800,000 4 $200,000 13 0.31 $31,707
Nodl $850,000 1 $850,000 10 0.1 $103,659
Kalinski $875,000 2 $437,500 10 0.2 $53,354
Laliberte $518,333 3 $172,778 11 0.27 $23,177

 

I separated these guys out because not one of them scored more than 5 points on the year and only Mika Pyorala played more than 13 games.  Also note that Leino's Cost/Pt(1) doesn't take into account the 7 points he scored in 42 games with Detroit, so his true cost is much lower.  But man is Andreas Nodl a steal!  I kid, I kid.

Now the truly interesting forwards table:


Cap Pts Cost/Pt(1) GP PPG Cost/Pt(2)
Briere $6,500,000 53 $122,642 75 0.71 $112,172
Richards $5,750,000 62 $92,742 82 0.76 $92,742
Gagne $5,250,000 40 $131,250 58 0.69 $92,835
Carter $5,000,000 61 $81,967 74 0.82 $73,970
Hartnell $4,200,000 44 $95,455 81 0.54 $94,290
van Riemsdyk $1,654,167 35 $47,262 78 0.45 $44,956
Laperriere $1,166,666 20 $58,333 82 0.24 $58,333
Carcillo $893,750 22 $40,625 76 0.29 $37,652
Giroux $821,667 47 $17,482 82 0.57 $17,482
Asham $640,000 24 $26,667 72 0.33 $23,415
Betts $550,000 18 $30,556 63 0.29 $23,476
Powe $520,000 15 $34,667 63 0.24 $26,634

 

Here is where we see how expensive injuries are.  Simon Gagne would have been just as expensive as Mike Richards - which makes sense given their cap hits are only separated by half a million dollars - but missing 24 games made his production the most expensive among Flyer forwards. 

This also shows how much a bad year hurts the team as Scott Hartnell was the third most expensive producer on the team, second most factoring in games played.  Also, you can see the other end of the spectrum here too.  The Flyers bottom six forwards were all dirt-cheap.  Specifically, six Claude Giroux points cost less than one Danny Briere point.

Really, this is nothing we didn't already know:  Your high-priced guys are paid to score while your medium-to-high priced guys are paid to do both.  Getting production out of your entry-level deal players goes a long way toward creating a successful team. 

Any thoughts?

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