FanPost

Flyers D is too international

Good evening from Switzerland!

After reading comments about our D being international, I took a closer look at how all the teams are put together in terms of nationalities. I wanted to see how the average NHL team looks (i.e. how many Russians, etc.), and how each organization put together their roster. I took the data of the Preseason Rosters on THN, so it is not 100% accurate anymore, and since there are so many different countries represented in the NHL, I focused on the Top 16 Nations.

So here’s how the average NHL Team is put together:

1

Canada

53.78%

2

USA

23.98%

3

Sweden

6.94%

4

Czech Republic

4.39%

5

Russia

3.16%

6

Finland

2.96%

7

Slovakia

1.22%

8

Switzerland

0.82%

9

Germany

0.71%

10

Denmark

0.61%

11

Belarus

0.31%

12

Austria

0.31%

13

Latvia

0.31%

14

Slovenia

0.20%

15

Norway

0.20%

16

France

0.10%

That means about half of a team is Canadian, a fourth is American, then you have approx. two Swedes, a Czech, a Russian, a Finnish player and one, maybe two ‚outliers’ from either Slovakia, Switzerland, Germany, Denmark, etc...

So how do the different teams look? And more interesting: How successful are they depending on the team’s nationalities? Here are the numbers:

Chi

12.2%

Bos

13.9%

Pit

23.1%

Lak

34.1%

Ana

36.2%

Mon

21.7%

Van

25.0%

Was

29.2%

Stl

6.8%

Tor

14.6%

San

3.2%

Nyr

36.0%

Det

40.8%

Ott

28.4%

Min

26.6%

Nyi

20.3%

Cbj

14.9%

Win

22.1%

Pho

15.8%

Phi

22.3%

Dal

25.4%

Njd

57.3%

Buf

55.4%

Edm

25.2%

Cal

26.7%

Car

33.6%

Nas

17.9%

Tbl

12.5%

Col

44.1%

Flo

22.8%

(marked in bold are the numbers that either differ from the average more than 40% or are closer than 14.5% (about 5 players) to the average.)

The teams that didn’t get to the playoffs averaged to be 28.28% off the model, the teams that made it to the playoffs were a little closer with 23.25%. Not that much off a difference. (The Flyers were pretty much average).

But what is rather significant: Teams that go more than 40% off the average roster seem to be bad (NJD, BUF, COL, with Red Wings being the exception...).

And on the other end: If the team is put together close to the average model, it seems to have success more likely (SAN, STL, CHI, BOS, with TB being the exception).

These data only show one year, and i wonder if this is a model that has any continuity, but I think: A too ‚Europeanized’ team is unlikely to be successful, and will have a hard time (assuming because of the different hockey culture/the NHL grind). You need a good amount of North-American players to compete, but you need to bring in Europeans as additions as well.

Of course, this is just nationalities, and in the globalized world nowadays, a kid in Finnland is going through the same development as one in Canada, but I still find it interesting. And making this post go full circle back to the Flyers D: If we go by the stereotypes (Europeans are small, light, not durable, but fast and have good skills, whereas North Americans are big, tough and gritty but slow and immobile), here’s our D:

‚Europeans’ – Kimmo, Streit, Gus, Mesz
NA’s’ – Coburn, Schenn
(assuming Grossman will be on LTIR, Lauridsen is sent down, and Gervais is...ahm...)

Looking at the Blackhawks D (in terms of speed and skill over hits and size), it might not be bad, but my first thought was: Are the Flyers actually too European on D and is that equal to ‚we will be pushed around’? This is a big leap of point being made from the beginning of this article, so to sum up:

If your team is close to the average concerning mix of nationalities, you are more likely to reach the POs than when you experiment with players from everywhere.

The Flyers D is very very international. Now with Streit even more so.

This item was written by a member of this community and is not necessarily endorsed by <em>Broad Street Hockey</em>.

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