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Oh, the arrogance: Chicago has the parade planned

CHICAGO - JUNE 06: Fans of the Chicago Blackhawks pose outside before Game Five of the 2010 NHL Stanley Cup Final at the United Center on June 6, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Andre Ringuette/Getty Images)
CHICAGO - JUNE 06: Fans of the Chicago Blackhawks pose outside before Game Five of the 2010 NHL Stanley Cup Final at the United Center on June 6, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Andre Ringuette/Getty Images)
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This doesn't even need to be editorialized. The following writing is, verbatim, right from the newsroom of WGN in Chicago.

For Blackhawks fans, it's not if, it's when. Destiny is in the air and the team is possibly a game away from causing its legion of fans to explode in celebration.

The city is anticipating a win and has planned a ticker tape parade Friday or Monday depending on when the Hawks clinch. Notice there's no wiggle room here, Hawk fans expect the team to bring home the Stanley Cup, something they haven't done since 1961.

If the Hawks win in Game 6 tonight, expect a Friday celebration. Should the Hawks lose tonight and win Friday, the city will have its celebration Monday.

Details about time and place haven't been disclosed, but if the White Sox winning the World Series is any indication, the Loop will be wall to wall people, so get there early. As in, if you want to see the actual Stanley Cup champions in person, dawn might be a good time to stake out a spot.

The words above aren't an implication on the writer of the article, who happens to be Pat Curry of WGN News. It's more of a window into how the city of Chicago feels about their 'Hawks, as highlighted by the lede. We notice that "there's no wiggle room here" and that Blackhawks fans clearly believe the Cup is their destiny.

The parade is planned for Friday or Monday, depending on when they win. They don't even think to entertain the possiblity that,  you know, the Flyers could actually win a Game 7 on Friday night.

Sure, as has been pointed out, planning is a necessary logistical step, but even whispering that those plans are being made just absolutely stinks. By comparison, Philadelphia didn't announce a parade for the 2008 Phillies until October 30th, the day after the clinching win, and Mayor Michael Nutter routinely declined comment on parade plans.

This type of arrogance is reminiscent of the Yankees. That's not a compliment. You'd think a city with a sporting history such as Chicago's would be smarter than this.