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Kimmo Timonen says he wants to coach, help bring Stanley Cup to Philly

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Kimmo Timonen spoke with the media after his retirement ceremony on Wednesday night, and he said that "down the road" he'd like to bring the Stanley Cup back to Philly in some sort of coaching role.

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You saw Kimmo Timonen honored before the Flyers game on Wednesday night. (If you didn't, go here.)

During the first intermission of the game, Kimmo talked to the Philadelphia media, where he said that he hopes to bring a Stanley Cup to Philadelphia someday -- even though he's no longer a player.

"I had a great time here in Philly," Timonen said. "Hopefully down the road I can do that for this team to help get to the playoffs and win the Stanley Cup. I wish that everybody could get a chance to win it because it’s something special.

"An ideal job would be some kind of coach because I like to talk to the players," Kimmo said. "I like to share my information, I like to teach people, I like to tell my opinion about almost anything. But in hockey that would be ideal because I like to tell these players what I see and what they can do better. That is a coaching job."

This seems like something that will almost certainly happen down the line for Kimmo -- some sort of player development or coaching role in the Flyers organization. But not yet. He wants some time off first.

"Right now, it takes too much time," he continued. "It’s the first time in my life I can actually enjoy my time. I want to spend time with my family and so on. That would be a perfect job but that’s obviously down the road. Right now I’m going to take it easy and hopefully 3 or 6 months, I know with my personality I need to do something. I can’t just sit still. We will see what kind of role I do and how I could help the team. That’s down the road."

We all know the organization and the city will welcome him back with open arms.

* * *

Here's the full transcript of Kimmo's talk with the media on Wednesday night:

Take us through the first part of retirement night to the dropping of the puck to the video tribute on the big board.

"It gave be goosebumps. It’s a great honor to be here. Brings back a lot of memories and good times. Seeing my buddy Hartsy speak there. All good and honored to be here."

You obviously won the cup in Chicago and you made a name for yourself in Nashville. You said this was your number one place. Why is that?

"We like the area with the family. Obviously, I’ve had all these ups and the way the Flyers treat you as a person, as a player. You can’t compare to any other organization. That’s huge but I felt like I was such a big role on the team too. I played a lot in every situation. Every player would like to have that role and I had it. All these good memories and my family likes it here. We are still here so that tells you a lot. You put all these things together; that’s why."

You said the other day that you didn’t miss it. That having teammates from both teams here did you feel like you wanted to get out there and skate today?


"I came here Monday night for the season opener to watch the game. I didn’t really feel that I should be out there. I went this morning to see morning skate, saw both teams and talked to a lot of guys. The music, the preparation, and getting ready for the game I kinda went ‘oh this would be nice again’.

Reality is I’m 40 years old. I just had a glass of red wine. Can’t really turn that down anymore. I’m enjoying the time right now. We’ll see in the future. I know in my mind I need to do something down the road but now it’s time for the family. Time to enjoy my life and actually tell myself to calm down, and actually enjoy it.

You were at Scott’s 1000th game in Columbus. How important is it that you guys are able to share each other’s moments like that?

"It’s funny because we played so many years together. We were roommates for eight years and you get traded at the same time to the same team as best friends. There’s not many stories like that in the NHL. When he had his 1000th game I had a chance to go there because I was recovering from blood clot. I wanted to do that for him. The way he spoke tonight, we are best buddies. There’s not much that you can tell other than I love him and he’s going to be my best friend forever."

You were only in Chicago for a couple of months but you really seemed to leave an impact in that room. What was that experience for you?

"Obviously, Chicago is a nice town. It was so easy to walk in there. I played a lot of hockey, see a lot of players, but those guys are a special group. When you win three Stanley Cups in six years it’s something special. I’ve seen a lot of hockey, I’ve seen a lot of teams get ready, and I’ve seen a lot of players that’s something special. I was able to, even in my old age, able to see something new. It was impressive."

When the fans were chanting your name there, what did that feel like?

"I wanted to take my jacket off and raise my hands really high. I’m not that flexible anymore. You can’t have that in life other than playing sports and have this kind of respect. There’s no way to put it other than saying thank you to the fans. I had a great time here in Philly. Hopefully down the road I can do that for this team to help get to the playoffs and win the Stanley Cup. I wish that everybody could get a chance to win it because it’s something special."

When you hear so many former teammates talk about how much respect they had for you as a teammate and as a leader; what does that mean to you personally?

"Obviously, it’s awesome but I always try to be the same person. The way I prepare for a game I expect it from every player. It doesn't matter to me if it’s your first year, tenth year, eighth year, or eighteen years. Sometimes it’s hard. You can’t expect people to play the same way or put the same effort.

Talk about leaders, I’ve seen a lot of different players and leaders. Perfect example Jonathan Toews with Chicago. He’s my top 1 or 2 captains I’ve ever seen in my life. The way he prepares for the game, how he does everything right and that’s commitment. I try to do the same way. I couldn't achieve the level he is but we all can do it. It requires a lot of commitment."

I know you’re still taking some time off but have you been able to sort of narrow down exactly what direction you want to take your career next?

"An ideal job would be some kind of coach because I like to talk to the players. I like to share my information, I like to teach people, I like to tell my opinion about almost anything, but in hockey that would be ideal because I like to tell these players what I see and what they can do better. That is a coaching job. Right now, it takes too much time. It’s the first time in my life I can actually enjoy my time. I want to spend time with my family and so on.

That would be a perfect job but that’s obviously down the road. Right now I’m going to take it easy and hopefully 3 or 6 months, I know with my personality I need to do something. I can’t just sit still. We will see what kind of role I do and how I could help the team. That’s down the road."